WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
  welcome
 
> online guides
 
  archives
 
  educational cd-rom
 
  current weather
 
  about ww2010
 
  index

Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
> meteorology
 
  remote sensing
 
  reading maps
 
  projects, activities

Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
  clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
> severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Severe Storms
 
  introduction
 
  dangers of t-storms
 
> types of t-storms
 
  tstorm components
 
  tornadoes
 
  modeling

Types of T-storms
 
  storm spectrum
 
  single cell storms
 
  multicell clusters
 
  multicell lines
 
> supercells

Supercells
 
  introduction
 
  on radar
 
  schematic diagrams
 
  features
 
  variations
 
> hp supercells
 
  lp supercells
 
  multicell to supercell
 
  tornadic supercell

HP Supercells
 
  introduction
 
  characteristics
 
  westward view
 
  flow field
 
> outflow boundary

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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Developing Along Outflow Boundaries
from previous thunderstorms

HP supercells frequently have been observed to develop or intensify as they moved parallel to and along a stationary outflow boundary from previous thunderstorms. This is a northward view of such an outflow boundary, with several large thunderstorms in the distant and extreme right side of the photo moving away from our position. Note the long shelf cloud that has been left behind the storms and along the boundary.

[Image: northward view, outflow boundary of HP supercell (48K)]
Photograph by: Doswell

Looking southwest along the same outflow boundary, observe the distant thunderstorm at the end of the outflow line, with the Cb tower and anvil visible on the left hand side of the photo.

[Image: southwest view, outflow boundary of HP supercell (50K)]
Photograph by: Doswell

A multiple-vortex tornado had just dissipated from beneath this distant updraft, and an opaque precipitation shaft was developing in the previously rain-free area where the tornado occurred.



flow field
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

LP Supercells