WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
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Online Guides
 
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> meteorology
 
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Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
  clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
> severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Severe Storms
 
  introduction
 
  dangers of t-storms
 
> types of t-storms
 
  tstorm components
 
  tornadoes
 
  modeling

Types of T-storms
 
  storm spectrum
 
  single cell storms
 
  multicell clusters
 
  multicell lines
 
> supercells

Supercells
 
  introduction
 
  on radar
 
  schematic diagrams
 
  features
 
  variations
 
  hp supercells
 
  lp supercells
 
  multicell to supercell
 
> tornadic supercell

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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Tornadic Supercell
produced six tornadoes

This supercell did produce tornadoes, six of them. About the time this photograph was taken, the last of the six tornadoes was occurring. From this vantage point about 20 miles north of the storm, near Itasca, Texas, we see a small portion of the rain-free base beneath the updraft area, but no tornado. Obviously, a spotter must have the right position relative to the storm to see tornadoes.

[Image: tornadic supercell viewed from the north (78K)]
Photograph by: Moller

The same storm and its sixth tornado were photographed in a different location at about the time the last photo was taken. Looking northeast from 4 miles, we are on the other side of the precipitation seen in the last photo.

[Image: tornadic supercell viewed from the southeast (49K)]
Photograph by: NWS

The left to right moving condensation funnel is partially illuminated by late afternoon lighting. Note the sharp-edged precipitation curtain on the right side. The combination of strong and adjacent vertical drafts often results in very heavy hail and rain curtains immediately downwind (usually northeast) of the updraft. Indeed, spotting position does make a difference, although the optimal view of a late afternoon supercell is not towards the northeast.



multicell to supercell
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Tstorm Components