WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
  welcome
 
> online guides
 
  archives
 
  educational cd-rom
 
  current weather
 
  about ww2010
 
  index

Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
> meteorology
 
  remote sensing
 
  reading maps
 
  projects, activities

Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
  clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
> severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Severe Storms
 
  introduction
 
> dangers of t-storms
 
  types of t-storms
 
  tstorm components
 
  tornadoes
 
  modeling

Dangers of T-storms
 
> lightning
 
  flash floods, hail
 
  outflow
 
  downbursts
 
  tornadoes

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

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Lightning
a visible electric discharge produced by thunderstorms

Let's review the destructive and deadly thunderstorm elements before introducing the thunderstorm spectrum. By definition, all thunderstorms contain lightning. This photograph shows lightning coming from the side of a cumulonimbus cloud.

[Image: lightning (45K)]
Photograph by: Moller

In most years it is the thunderstorm's greatest killer. A possible contributing reason for this is that lightning victims frequently are struck before or just after the occurrence of precipitation at their location. Many people apparently feel safe from lightning when not experiencing rain.



Severe Storms
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

flash floods, hail