WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
  welcome
 
> online guides
 
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  index

Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
> meteorology
 
  remote sensing
 
  reading maps
 
  projects, activities

Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
  clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
> severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Severe Storms
 
  introduction
 
  dangers of t-storms
 
> types of t-storms
 
  tstorm components
 
  tornadoes
 
  modeling

Types of T-storms
 
  storm spectrum
 
  single cell storms
 
  multicell clusters
 
  multicell lines
 
> supercells

Supercells
 
  introduction
 
  on radar
 
  schematic diagrams
 
  features
 
  variations
 
  hp supercells
 
  lp supercells
 
> multicell to supercell
 
  tornadic supercell

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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Evolution From Multicell To Supercell
multiple updrafts merge into a single updraft

This late afternoon New Mexico storm has subtle indications of being multicellular. Can you see the two major updraft areas? You cannot always discern between storm types by visual observations. Radar usually is the best tool for that purpose, but in many cases the visual appearance will yield important clues.

[Image: supercell or multicell visual clues (42K)]
Photograph by: Olthoff

This is the same storm complex less than one our later. The multicell complex apparently has evolved into a storm with one dominant updraft. The storm has become a supercell.

[Image: multicell develops into supercell (40K)]
Photograph by: Olthoff

The storms we have seen lead us to ask several fundamental questions: What environmental factors influence the type or types of storms and the intensity of severe weather that occurs on a given day? And why does a storm sometimes evolve from one type to another?



LP Supercells
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

tornadic supercell