WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
  welcome
 
> online guides
 
  archives
 
  educational cd-rom
 
  current weather
 
  about ww2010
 
  index

Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
> meteorology
 
  remote sensing
 
  reading maps
 
  projects, activities

Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
  clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
> severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Severe Storms
 
  introduction
 
  dangers of t-storms
 
> types of t-storms
 
  tstorm components
 
  tornadoes
 
  modeling

Types of T-storms
 
  storm spectrum
 
  single cell storms
 
  multicell clusters
 
  multicell lines
 
> supercells

Supercells
 
  introduction
 
  on radar
 
  schematic diagrams
 
> features
 
  variations
 
  hp supercells
 
  lp supercells
 
  multicell to supercell
 
  tornadic supercell

Features
 
  overshooting tops
 
  rotating updrafts
 
> backlighting

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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Backlighting
for better viewing of tornadoes

A view toward the west or northeast, often with revealing backlighting, typically offers the best view. This is the same Itaska, Texas storm, seen through a telephoto lens, looking west from about 15 miles!

[Image: tornado and wall cloud in backlighting (38K)]
Photograph by: NWS

Such spectacular distant views are relatively rare, especially in the east and southeast U.S. where low clouds, haze, precipitation, trees, and hills make spotting from a distance more difficult.

[Image: cumulonimbus cloud and tornado (40K)]
Photograph by: NWS
In this rare photograph we can see both the parent cumulonimbus cloud (Cb) and the tornado.

The indentation on the left side of the Cb in this photo seems to verify the presence of a rear flank downdraft (RFD), with a clear distinction between hard-textured updraft cloud and the ragged, dissipating cloud elements caught in the RFD. The tornado is at the intersecting point of the rotating updraft and RFD.



rotating updrafts
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Supercells