WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
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Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
  meteorology
 
> remote sensing
 
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Remote Sensing
 
  introduction
 
> radars
 
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Radars
 
  introduction
 
  radar basics
 
  imagery
 
  velocity patterns
 
> applications

Applications
 
  tornadoes
 
> hurricanes
 
  forecasting
 
  flash floods
 
  snow storms
 
  hail

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

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Hurricanes on Radar
circular areas of moderate to high reflectivity

Hurricanes show up clearly on radar as circular areas of moderate to high reflectivity, often surrounding a low reflectivity center.

[Image: reflectivity field for Hurricane Andrew (101K)]
Image by: NHC

This image shows the reflectivity field from the eye wall of Hurricane Andrew. The symmetry shown in this image indicates that Andrew was a very well developed hurricane. The ring of orange are the high reflectivities associated with the convection found in the eye wall.

[Image: reflectivity field for Hurricane Erin (44K)]

This image shows the reflectivity field from a scan of Hurricane Erin on August 2, 1995. The lack of symmetry indicates that Erin was a rather weak hurricane, especially compared to Andrew.

[Image: velocity field for Hurricane Erin (26K)]

The velocity field of Hurricane Erin reveals the strong counterclockwise rotation responsible for the inward flow on the storm's north side and the outward flow on the south side. Negative values (blue-green) denote movement toward the radar and positive values (yellow-red) represent movement away from the radar.

[Image: reflectivity field for Hurricane Roxanne (96K)]
Image by: NWS

This image shows the reflectivity field from a scan of hurricane Roxanne on October 19, 1994. High reflectivities north and east of the eye are associated with strong convection present in the eye wall.



tornadoes
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

forecasting