WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
  welcome
 
  online guides
 
> archives
 
  educational cd-rom
 
  current weather
 
  about ww2010
 
  index

Archives
 
> case studies

Case Studies
 
  introduction
 
> veterans day snow
 
  hurricane andrew
 
  4/19 il tornadoes
 
  superstorm '93

Veterans Day Snow
 
  introduction
 
> personal perspective
 
  data and analysis
 
  advanced topics

Personal Perspective
 
  newspaper clippings
 
  north chardon, ohio
 
> shaker hts, ohio
 
  eyewitness log

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
.
Photographs from Shaker Hts., Ohio
November 9-14, 1996 in the Great Lakes

The following pictures were scanned from photographs provided by Lorra Laven (see second photograph) who lives in Shaker Hts, Ohio in eastern Cuyahoga county. The photos were taken on November 10,13 and 14th, 1996. Lorra has also provided an entertaining and thorough eyewitness log of this case study.

[Image: covered shrubs (65K)]
Photograph by: Lorra Laven

The wet snowfall from a cyclone on Nov 9-10, 1996 and the subsequent heavy LES event, devastated trees and shrubs in the "Heights" suburbs east & southeast of Cleveland, Ohio. The clean-up costs in Shaker Hts. alone were estimated at $ 2.5 million dollars - the cleanup is nearly complete as of early July, 1997.

[Image: standing in the snow (65K)]
Photograph by: Lorra Laven

There were many trees which suffered the same fate as pictured below. Instead of losing individual branches or uprooting - the tree literally split down the main trunk, opening like an "ear of corn".

[Image: damaged tree (78K)]
Photograph by: Lorra Laven

Snowfall in Shaker Hts. was estimated by spotters at about 50" with perhaps 36-38" on the ground at any one time. The snow fell in intense bands with variable breaks between bands. Bright sunshine was intermittently observed on the first four days of the storm - as was thunder and lightning! The greatest one-hour accumulation reported from this location was 3.5" on Monday evening Nov 11, 1996.

[Image: heavy snow on rooftops (67K)]
Photograph by: Lorra Laven

The consistency of the snowfall was denser compared to typical lake-effect snow. The lake was very warm in this early season storm and surface temperatures never fell much below freezing. Denser frozen precipitation particles such as snow grains, graupel, and snow pellets (a dense aggregate of snow crystals and graupel) were all common during the storm suggesting the clouds contained an unusually high amount of liquid water and possibly very strong updrafts (compared to other lake-effect storms).

[Image: corn snow (64K)]
Photograph by: Lorra Laven



north chardon, ohio
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Eyewitness Log