WW2010
University of Illinois

WW2010
 
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Online Guides
 
  introduction
 
> meteorology
 
  remote sensing
 
  reading maps
 
  projects, activities

Meteorology
 
  introduction
 
  air masses, fronts
 
> clouds, precipitation
 
  el nino
 
  forces, winds
 
  hurricanes
 
  hydrologic cycle
 
  light, optics
 
  midlatitude cyclones
 
  severe storms
 
  weather forecasting

Clouds, Precipitation
 
  introduction
 
> development
 
  cloud types
 
  precipitation

Development
 
  states of water
 
  relative humidity
 
  rising air
 
  convection
 
> convergence
 
  topography
 
  fronts
 
  rain or snow

User Interface
 
  graphics
> text

NOTE: We've guessed that you're not using a client that supports colored tables and have tried to compensate. Low graphics mode looks much better on clients that do... we recommend switching to Netscape 3.0 or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
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Lifting by Convergence
broad lifting of an entire layer of air

Convergence is an atmospheric condition that exists when there is a horizontal net inflow of air into a region. When air converges along the earth's surface, it is forced to rise since it cannot go downward.

Large scale convergence can lift a layer of air hundreds of kilometers across.

[Image: thickening cirrus and cirrostratus at sunset (56K)]
Photograph by: Rauber

Vertical motions associated with convergence are typically much weaker than the small-scale vertical motions associated with convective processes. As a result, clouds generated through convergence, for example cirrostratus clouds, are typically less vertically developed than convective clouds.



convection
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

topography