WW2010
University of Illinois

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Strong Tornado
wind speeds vary from 110 to 200 MPH

The typical strong tornado often has what is popularly considered a more "classic" funnel-shaped cloud associated with the whirling updraft. Rotating wind speeds vary from 110 to 200 MPH.

[Image: strong tornado (68K)]
Photograph by: NSSL

Nearly 3 in 10 tornadoes are strong, such as this twister on the plains of North Dakota. Looking northeast (from about 2 miles), note the spiraling inflow cloud, probably a tail cloud, feeding into the tornado. An important safety consideration is that weak and strong tornadoes by definition do not level well-built homes. Thus, a secure home will offer shelter from almost 100 percent of all direct tornado strikes.


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Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.