Graphic by: Dan Bramer

Interact with Atlantic hurricanes from 1950-2007!!

Hurricanes are cyclones that develop over the warm tropical oceans and have sustained winds in excess of 64 knots (74 miles/hour). These storms are capable of producing dangerous winds, torrential rains and flooding, all of which may result in tremendous property damage and loss of life in coastal populations. One memorable storm was Hurricane Andrew (pictured above), which was responsible for at least 50 deaths and more than $30 billion in property damage. The purpose of this module is to introduce hurricanes and their associated features, to show where hurricanes develop, and to explain the atmospheric conditions necessary for hurricane development. The Hurricane module has been organized into the following sections:

Last Update: 09/16/99
Definition and Growth
Defines a hurricane and shows the regions and mechanics of hurricane development.

Stages of Development
The different stages of development from depression to hurricane.

Structure of a Hurricane
Discusses the structure of different parts of hurricanes.

The influence of global winds on the movement of hurricanes.

Satellites and Hurricane Hunters
Discusses the tools and means meteorologists use to observe and track hurricanes.

Includes a list of matters to consider if you are threatened by a hurricane.

Damage and Destruction
Destructive features associated with hurricanes, plus the Saffir-Simpson Scale for classifying damage potential.

Hurricane Tracks
Track Atlantic Hurricanes interactively from 1950 to 2003.

How They Are Named
The different names given to hurricane-like storms in different parts of the world.

Global Activity
Discusses the regions of the Earth where tropical cyclones can be found.

El Niño
See how El Niño appears to affect hurricane activity.

Those who contributed to the development of this module.

The navigation menu (left) for this module is called "Hurricanes" and the menu items are arranged in a recommended sequence, beginning with this introduction. In addition, this entire web server is accessible in both "graphics" and "text"-based modes, a feature controlled from the blue "User Interface" menu (located beneath the black navigation menus). More information about the user interface options, the navigation system, or WW2010 in general is accessible from About This Server.

Land Breezes
Terms for using data resources. CD-ROM available.
Credits and Acknowledgments for WW2010.
Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) at
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Growth Processes